Coinage

   Constantine I (q.v.) introduced the gold nomisma (Latin solidus) at 72 nomismata per pound of gold. The nomisma was used primarily by the state to pay its soldiers and bureaucrats, and in its relations with other states. Beyond that it served as a constant standard to which the other gold, silver, and copper coinage (whose types were inevitably less long-lived) were related. Thus, the gold semissis was half a nomisma, and the gold tremissis was a third of a nomisma; both types lasted until 878. The tetarteron, introduced by Nikephoros II Phokas (q.v.) was a quarter of a tremissis. The basic silver coin was the miliaresion, evaluated at 12 to the nomisma. The follis (q.v.), the chief copper coin introduced by Anastasios I (q.v.), was calculated at 288 per nomisma, and 24 per silver miliaresion. Rigorous maintenance of an unadulterated nomisma of standard weight made it an international currency until the late 11th century, by which time it had been adulterated and was in need of reform. Alexios I Komnenos (q.v.) introduced a reformed nomisma, called the hyperpyron in 1092, an electrum worth a third of the new nomisma, which became the standard gold coin until the empire fell to the Ottomans (q.v.). It was much competed against by the foreign gold and silver coins that were increasingly used within the empire.

Historical Dictionary of Byzantium . .

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  • coinage — coin‧age [ˈkɔɪnɪdʒ] noun [uncountable] 1. ECONOMICS the system of coins used in a country: • Britain did not use decimal coinage until 1971. ˌstandard ˈcoinage ECONOMICS a system where a coin s value is the same as the value of the metal it… …   Financial and business terms

  • Coinage — may refer to: coins, standardized as currency neologism, coinage of a new word COINage, numismatics magazine Tin coinage, a tax on refined tin ancestry Coinage, a board game See also Coining (disambiguation) Coin (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

  • Coinage — Coin age, n. [From {Coin}, v. t., cf. {Cuinage}.] 1. The act or process of converting metal into money. [1913 Webster] The care of the coinage was committed to the inferior magistrates. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. Coins; the aggregate coin of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • coinage — [koin′ij] n. [ME < OFr coignaige] 1. the act or process of coining 2. metal money; coins 3. a system of money or metal currency 4. an invented word or expression [laser is a recent coinage] …   English World dictionary

  • coinage — index cash, formation, invention, money, origination Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • coinage — late 14c., currency, money, from O.Fr. coignage, from coignier to coin (see COIN (Cf. coin)). Meaning act or proces of coining money is from early 15c.; sense deliberate formation of a new word is from 1690s, from a general sense of something… …   Etymology dictionary

  • coinage — coin, currency, cash, specie, legal tender, *money …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • coinage — ► NOUN 1) coins collectively. 2) the action or process of producing coins. 3) a system or type of coins in use. 4) the invention of a new word or phrase. 5) a newly invented word or phrase …   English terms dictionary

  • coinage — [[t]kɔ͟ɪnɪʤ[/t]] 1) N UNCOUNT Coinage is the coins which are used in a country. The city produced its own coinage from 1325 to 1864. ...the world s finest collection of medieval European coinage. 2) N UNCOUNT Coinage is the system of money used… …   English dictionary

  • coinage — /koy nij/, n. 1. the act, process, or right of making coins. 2. the categories, types, or quantity of coins issued by a nation. 3. coins collectively; currency. 4. the act or process of inventing words; neologizing. 5. an invented or newly… …   Universalium

  • coinage — coin|age [ˈkɔınıdʒ] n 1.) [U] the system or type of money used in a country ▪ the gold coinage of the Roman empire 2.) a word or phrase that has been recently invented ▪ The phrase glass ceiling is a fairly recent coinage. 3.) [U] the invention… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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